Wednesday, April 19, 1865

Raleigh, North Carolina

HDQRS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 19, 1865.
Brigadier General L. S. BAKER, C. S. Army, Nash County, N. C.:
GENERAL: Yours of the 18th is received. General Johnston has not made an actual surrender of his army, but we have been in conference and have agreed on general terms, which, if approved at Washington, will, in my judgment, terminate the war and provide for all the armies of the Confederacy. I have shown the stipulations to your officer, and leave to choose your course, either to accept the terms of Lee’s army to await a few days the more general arrangement contemplated with Johnston, which, fact, is approved by Mr. Davis. If your wish to disperse your men let them deposit their arms and let a field officer sign a parole for them and send me the list. Any officer may safely come in, as hostilities are suspended.
Yours, truly,
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

General Johnston wants troop movements in South Carolina halted:

Greensborough, North Carolina
Major General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding U. S. Forces in North Carolina:
GENERAL: As your troops are moving from the coast toward the interior of South Carolina, and from Columbus toward Macon, Ga., I respectfully suggest that you send copies of your orders announcing the suspension of hostilities for transmittal to them by me, supposing the interior route to be the shortest.
Most respectfully, your obedient servant,
J. E. JOHNSTON, General, C. S. Army

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, raleigh, N. C., April 19, 1865
General GILLMORE, Charleston:
I have made an agreement with the Confederate general for a general suspension of hostilities until certain terms are approved at Washington. These terms embrace the disbandment of all the Confederate armies and a firm and lasting peace. You will therefore cease all further destruction of public or private property, and make disposition looking to a general peace.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 19, 1865.
General GILLMORE, Charleston:
Your dispatch of April 16 is received. All right. You may now recall General Hatch to the Santee. Keep pickets about Branchville and the Santee bridge, and await the further developments. I have no doubt that a general surrender of all the Confederate armies is arranged. and only awaits a confirmation from Washington. All is well with us everywhere.
Yours,
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

HDQRS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 19, 1865. 12 m.
General GILLMORE, Hilton Head via Morehead City:
I have your dispatch of 1 p. m. of the 17th. The expedition to Augusta is now unnecessary, as all the Confederate armies will be disbanded under a convention made between me and General Johnston. You can hold Branchviille and the Santee bridge and await further orders.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, Numbers 58.
HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 19, 1865.
The general commanding announces to the army a suspension of hostilities and an agreement with General Johnston and other high officials, which, when formally ratified, will make peace from the Potomac to the Rio Grande. Until the absolute peace is arranged a line passing through Tyrrell’s Mount, Chapel Hill, University, Durham Station, and West Point on the Neuse River will separate the two armies. Each army commander will group his camps entirely with a view to comfort, health, and good police.
All the details of military discipline must still be maintained, and the general hopes and believes that in a very few days it will be his good fortune to conduct you all to your homes. The fame of this army for courage, industry, and discipline is admitted all over the world; then let each officer and man see that it is not stained by any acts of vulgarity, rowdyism, or petty crime. The cavalry will patrol the front line; General Howard will take charge of the district and General Schofield, in Raleigh, its right and rear.

Quartermasters and commissaries will keep their supplies up to a light load for their wagons, and the railroad superintendents will arrange a depot for the convenience of each separate army.
By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:
L. M. DAYTON, Assistant Adjutant-General

I will review the Tenth Army Corp tomorrow and the 23rd the next day. General Davis is running low on supply of meat.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 19, 1865
Major-General SCHOFIELD, Commanding, &c.:
GENERAL: You will please order a guard of 150 men, supplied with three day’s rations, to report to Colonel W. W. Wright, superintendent U. S. railroads, at the Raleigh and Gaston Depot tomorow morning at daylight. Colonel Wright is going out to reconnoiter the Gaston railroad by order of the general-in-chief.
With respect,
L. M. DAYTON, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General

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