Monday, April 3, 1865

Goldsboro, North Carolina

SL Fremont fought for the enemy. Now he wants me to protect his railroad.

TO GEORGE F. GRANGER
Head-Quarters Military Division of the Mississippi, In the Field Goldsboro, April 3, 1865

Col. Granger, “V”
Tell S. L. Fremont that I am the same person he knew in the Old Army but that he is not. Tell him I don’t want to see a man who knew better but in the hour of trouble abandoned the Country that had nurtured him. I shall appropriate to the use of the U.S. every particle of property pertaining to the Railroad which is forfeited a thousand times for treason. Tell S. L. Fremont I will give him a Pass to Nassau or to a Foreign Port but if he remains in our lines he is simply tolerated and must keep close indoors. Let him return to Wilmington and not meddle with the Road or anything pertaining to it.
W.T. Sherman, Major General

U. S. STEAMER SHAMROCK, District of the Sounds of North Carolina, Chowan River, off Winton, April 3, 1865
Major General W. T. SHERMAN, U. S. Army, &c.:
GENERAL: I arrived here yesterday afternoon, and found the First New York Mounted Rifles waiting, they having arrived that morning. I ferried them over, and they marched on for Murfreesborough last night. I am dragging the river ahead, so as to be able to push on to the same place, where I hope to arrive this morning. I have to advance very slowly, on account of having to drag the river all the way ahead of us for torpedoes. We have met with no resistance, and found no torpedoes so far. Some few rebels had been seen by the First New York on the western shore of the river, and a few shots have been exchanged. As near as I can learn there are scarcely any rebels in this vicinity. Three canal boats followed me up the river, with some infantry and rations on board. They are now here.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
W. H. MACOMB, Commander, Commanding

Schofield orders the protection of our coastal bases and the creation of a new supply base further north on the Chowan after we Goldsboro:

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, Numbers 20.
HDQRS. DEPT. OF NORTH CAROLINA, ARMY OF THE OHIO, Goldsborough, N. C., April 3, 1865.

During the operations of the main armies which are about to commence, Goldsborough, and the New Bern Wilmington railroads will be abandoned as far back as Kinston and East Point. The Eighty-fifth New York Infantry, now at Goldsborough, will remain at that place until notified by Colonel W. W. Wright, superintendent of railroads, that all surplus stores have been removed to the rear, and that the use of the road is about to cease, when that regiment will move by rail, if practicable, at least as far back as the Neuse bridge below Kinston. Brigadier General I. N. Palmer, commanding District of Beaufort, will maintain his present force at Kinston until notified by Colonel Wright that the use of the railroad to that point has ceased, when he will withdraw to New Bern all of that force except one good regiment. This regiment will be securely intrenched at the Neuse railroad bridge, with a strong picket at the wagon bridge to prevent their destruction (especially at the railroad bridge) by any small force of the enemy. Brigadier General Joseph R. Hawley, commanding District of Wilmington, N. C., will hold possession of the railroad from Wilmington as far as Strickland’s Depot until notified by Colonel Wright that the use of that road is about to cease, when he will withdraw all his troops as far back as the railroad bidge at East Point, where he will maintain a strong picket securely intrenched to protect that bridge. That portion of the First Division, Tenth Army Corps, now at New Berne and Morehead City, will be held in readiness to move by sea in connection with the main depot of supplies under orders which will be given from headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi.

By command of Major-General Schofield:
A. CAMPBELL, Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General

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