Sunday, April 2, 1865

Goldsborough, North Carolina

We continue to refit the army.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., April 2, 1865. 11:55 p. m.
ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.:
After consultation with General Grant and the President at City Point, I have announced General Slocum as commanding the Army of Georgia, composed of the Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps; and have announced General Mower to command the Twentieth Corps. Please make orders to cover these two cases. All well here and everything working well.
W.T. SHERMAN, Major-General

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, Numbers 45.
HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., April 2, 1865.
In order to equalize the means of transportation in the army the following-named transfers will be made immediately: From Fourteenth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 7. From Fifteenth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 190; ambulances and teams complete, 58. From Seventeenth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 7; ambulances and teams complete, 11. From Twentieth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 81- to be transferred to the Army of the Ohio. In making these transfers the worst animals, wagons, ambulances, harness, &c., will not be selected, but an average number as regards condition must be transferred from each corps. A board of officers, to consist of Colonel Parry, Forty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Lieutenant Colonel W. J. Jordan, One hundred and fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Major Francis Lackner, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, will assemble at the office of the chief quatermaster April 4, 12 m., to inspect the property when transferred, and report on its condition and whether these orders have been properly carried out. Major-General Schofield will designate a quartermaster of his command to receive and account for the property so transferred.
By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

Cruft’t troops are arriving for Terry’s command:
HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., April 2, 1865.
Major-General TERRY, Faison’s:
Troops and recruits for your and other corps are marching from Wilmington in considerable numbers. Be prepared to give them rations sufficient to reach their commands.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, April 2, 1865.
COMMANDING OFFICER, Wilmington, N.C.:
You will, by direction of Major-General Sherman, give daily reports to these headquarters of the arrival of troops at Wilmington destined for this army. You will see they are organized and armed in squads of not less than 500 and dispatched to their commands as rapidly as possible, marching along by roads substantially by the railroad.
L. M. DAYTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

WILMINGTON, April 2, 1865.

Major L M. DAYTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Goldsborough:
Lieutenant Colonel McManus, One hundred and second Illinois, with 1,700 men of the Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps, organized as a provisional brigade of General Cruft’s provisional division, arrived yesterday evening and will march in the morning with four days’ rations, expecting to get more at Faison’s Station. He takes with him Captain Logan with about 330 men of the Fifteenth, Seventeenth, and Twenty-third Corps, about 411 recruits, a few of the latter belonging to General Terry’s corps. Lieutenant-Colonel O’Brien, Seventy-fifth Indiana, arrived to-day with about 1,300 of the Second Brigade of General Cruft’s division, and has 900 more on the way. It is impossible for me to arm men here. I have sent no unarmed men except under good escort.
J. R. HAWLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., April 2, 1865.

General HAWLEY, Wilmington:
Your telegram is received, and is very satisfactory. You may count on finding rations at Faison’s for all men you forward, and army commanders will be notified that arms may be provided here.,
L. M. DAYTON, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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