Friday, March 31, 1865

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., March 31, 1865

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:
DEAR SIR: I had the honor and satisfaction to receive your letter and telegram of welcome when at City Point and Old Point Comfort. I am again back at my post, possessed of the wishes and plans of the general-in-chief, and think in due time I can play my part in the coming campaign. All things are working well, and I have troops enough to accomplish the part assigned me, and only await the loading our wagons, patching up and mending made necessary by the wear and tear of the past winter. Feeling as I do the responsibilities that rest on me, I shall spare no labor of body or mind to deserve the success and consequent blessings that you so heartily call down on me. Others must tell you of the continued harmony and confidence that pervades this army, to which qualities the country owes more than to any mere ability that I possess. Your son is now here, and will return to Washington with John Sherman.
With great respect,
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISIONOF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., March 31, 1865

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT, City Point:
GENERAL: I reached Goldsborough last night and find all things working well. The enemy has manifested no activity hereabouts, and only some cavalry simply moving across our front from west to east. The railroad to the sea coast at Morehead City is working well, and is doing good work, but the Wilmington branch is not yet done. I have concluded arrangements for the barges to be loaded, brought to Kinston, where our wagons will be loaded, and afterward reloaded and moved up to the Chowan to await our arrival north of Roanoke. I shall keep things moving and be all ready by the date fixed, April 10.

In the meantime I expect to hear from your movement by the left flank. I will keep you daily advised of progress. I must now set to work to make a report of our march from Savannah to Goldsborough before it fades from memory or gets lost in the rush of events. John Sherman came with me here and will return with this to Old Point. I think Lee will unite his and Johnston’s army. I cannot think he will coop himself in Richmond. If he does, he is not the general he is reputed to be; but we must go straight for him and fight him in open ground, or coop him up where starvation will tame him. If Sheridan swings off, and is likely to come down toward me, get me word that I may meet him. I doubt if he can cross the Roanoke for a month yet unless he has pontoons with him, but he cannot be better employed than in raiding the road about Burkeville.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., March 31, 1865
General McCALLUM, Morehead City:
Colonel Wright went this morning toward Wilmington to see about the road. We will do the best we can with present stock. You may send all five-foot gauge stock to Portsmouth and aim to repair the road out to Weldon on a five-foot gauge. I will have no use for the Norfolk and Petersburg road. I have instructed General Easton to discontinue the extension of the wharf at Morehead City, but to use it without calling on your railroad stock. All hands are instructed as to the importance of loading and unloading cars without a minute’s stoppage.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., March 31, 1865

General TERRY, Commanding at Faison’s Station:
Send orders to the depot commissary of subsistence at Wilmington to send forward coffee, sugar, and hard bread, with all possible dispatch. Let them come up the river to the bridge, and thence by rail to this place. We greatly need these stores. Two additional locomotives and about twenty cars and now at Wilmington, reach for your branch of the road as soon as the bridge is done. Answer.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

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