Thursday, November 10, 1864

Kingston, Ga., November 10,1864. 8:30 p.m.
Honorable C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War:
If indiscreet newspaper men publish information too near the truth, counteract its effect by publishing other paragraphs calculated to mislead the enemy, such as “Sherman’s army has been much reinforced, especially in the cavalry, and he will soon move by several columns in circuit, so as to catch Hood’s army;” or “Sherman’s destination is not Charleston, but Selma, where he will meet an army from the Gulf,” &c.
W. T. Sherman, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.

General EASTON, Atlanta, Ga.:
I don’t think the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Seventeenth Army Corps have any grain, only what they have foraged. You may order forward all trains that have forage on board that can possibly reach Atlanta by tomorrow night.

Three trains left Chattanooga this p. m., two of which are destined to Atlanta, which are due there at 8:30 tomorrow. These will be allowed to go through and will be the last trains through, unless there is some pressing necessity, of which I would like to be advised now.

Tonight General Corse will abandon Rome and tomorrow will move to this point. The next day, the 12th, General Davis will uncover Kingston and move to the Etowah; therefore you can use the railroad below this point till about daylight of the 12th. See Colonel Beckwith and make your calculations close, and it would be prudent to have a surplus both of forage and provisions, and after loading the wagons men will fill their haversacks. I think there are now cars enough here and below to clean out Atlanta of everything of value. It would be a Godsend to the quartermaster’s department if we could burn up a few thousand of your wagons and tents.

When I start I propose to move with great rapidity, faster than cattle can possibly gain on us. They are now five days behind and could not possibly catch up, as I will break the Etowah and Chattanooga bridges in passing, and those streams are now too high to cross without bridges. We can safety rely on the country for half rations of meat. Where a million of people live, I have no fear of getting a share.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.
General HOWARD, Smyrna;
I hear nothing of troops going to Jonesborough excepting a vague report from Corse. Thomas still reports all of Hood’s infantry about Tuscumbia. I have no doubt all the cavalry the enemy can scratch together will rendezvous about Jonesborough, but we can walk over them without delay.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.
General John E. SMITH, Cartersville, Ga.:
General Corse will start from Rome tomorrow morning, and should reach the neighborhood of Cartersville during the 12th. As soon as you hear of his approach you will put in motion your Division and proceed in the direction of Atlanta, overtaking your corps and reporting to its commander. Be careful that not a dollar’s worth of Government property be left at Cartersville, the Etowah bridge, or Allatoona. If it has not been sent away, I wish it destroyed. Leave a rear guard at the bridge until it is relieved by General Davis or General Corse.
W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General, Commanding

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga.
Brigadier General John M. CORSE, Rome, Ga.:
In the execution of sealed orders, Numbers 115, you will destroy tonight all public property not needed by your command, all foundries, mills, workshops, warehouses, railroad depot, or other store-houses convenient to the railroad, together with all wagon-shops, tanneries, or other factories useful to our enemy. Destroy the bridges completely, and then move your command tomorrow to Kingston and beyond, passing General Davis’ command, after which proceed by easy marches till you overtake your corps, and report to its commander.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.
General SLOCUM, Atlanta:
You may publish Special Field Orders, Numbers 119, and furnish copies of Numbers 120 down to brigade commanders, but don’t read it to troops until further orders. The organization (Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps) may be called Left Wing, Army of Georgia.
L. M. DAYTON, Aide-de-Camp

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.
General J. C. DAVIS, Commanding Fourteenth Corps:
I send you the men brought in today by Colonel Morgan, of your command, in compliance with orders form these headquarters. General Sherman desires that you keep the citizens under good guard until further orders, and if you have irons, you may fetter the man Hendricks; otherwise, tie in such manner that he cannot possibly get away. He is the captain of the guerrillas by his own acknowledgment, and will use all effort to escape. The general will make orders tomorrow.
I am, &c,
L. M. DAYTON, Aide-de-Camp

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.
General JEFF. C. DAVIS, Kingston, Ga.:
General Corse is ordered to evacuate Rome tonight and to march tomorrow to this place and on toward Atlanta. Unless you get other orders, you will commence the movement indicated in Special Field Orders, Numbers 115, on the morning after tomorrow, namely the 12th instant, bringing up the rear of the whole command. You had better send a brigade to the Etowah bridge from Cartersville day after tomorrow to hold it until everything is past, after which proceed to the execution of the order literally, aiming to arrive at Atlanta on the fourth day after leaving Kingston.
By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:
HENRY HITCHCOCK, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

Thomas Reports from Nashville:

Your dispatch of 6:30 p.m. yesterday just received. My dispatch of last night contained all the information I could get up to that time. I have a dispatch this morning from General Hatch, dated yesterday at Taylor’s Springs, as follows:

I moved my entire command forward this morning to the four main crossings on Shoal Creek, found the water had risen during the night and continued to rise so speedily horses could not ford anywhere. The enemy’s pickets were posted at all the fords, mostly cavalry, which was easily driven back. A prisoner from the Sixty-Third Virginia reports one corps and one Division of infantry on this side of the Tennessee River with about 2,000 cavalry, the balance of Hood’s army on the south side. I have not heard from party sent last night in boats to cut Hood’s pontoons or the detachment sent around Hood’s left flank to pick them up.

Granger reports the river rising; if so, I hardly think Hood will venture to throw a very large force across the river, nor can he molest you much, as the streams between you have doubtless been as much affected by the rain as those in Tennessee. I have the promise of Admiral Lee of hearty co-operation on his part as soon as the river rises sufficiently to permit iron-clads to run up. I have just received another dispatch from General Hatch which confirms his dispatch reported above. This last dated at 5 a. m. today. He further says that his scout went across the river and found the greater part of the enemy’s infantry at Tuscumbia and Iuka, none at Easport or Corinth. Your dispatch to General Grant was forwarded this morning by an officer from your headquarters.

KINGSTON, November 10, 1864. 8:30 p.m.
Major-General THOMAS, Nashville:
Your dispatch of 5 p. m. is received. All will be ready to start from here the day after tomorrow. Keep me well advised. I think you will find Hood marching off, and you should be ready to follow him. Decatur, Tuscaloosa, Columbus, and Selma are all good points to forage and feed an army. Let us keep Beauregard busy, and the people of the South will realize his inability to protect them.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 10, 1864.
Major General JAMES B. STEEDMAN, Commanding District of the Etowah, Chattanooga, Tenn.:
General Corse is ordered to abandon Rome tonight and move to Kingston to-morrow. Unless something extraordinary happens we will leave Kingston on the following day, namely, the 12th, uncovering the railroad. I will instruct all trains to be above this place by the time we leave, when you must be prepared to cover their removal into Chattanooga in compliance with Field Orders, Numbers 115. Give notice to the railroad superintendents to dispatch all trains heretofore ordered, and arrange for their running day and night, so as to enable us to afford them the necessary protection. Organize all recruits for the four corps with me into battalions, keeping those of each corps separate and distinct. Report them to General Thomas. Colonel Beckwith will instruct about the cattle. No cattle should be sent to Atlanta as they cannot reach there in time.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

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