Saturday, November 5, 1864

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.
Major-General SLOCUM, Atlanta, Ga.:
Load your trains and prepare your command at once for the march, and move it out on the McDonough road some two miles and await your orders for the final move. You will leave your provost guard and such details as General Easton and Colonel Beckwith may wish.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

ATLANTA, November 5, 1864. 9 p.m.
Major-General SHERMAN:
Kilpatrick has ordered Garrard’s cavalry to Marietta. If the cavalry leaves here I think my corps should be brought back within the fortifications. It has been moved on the McDonaugh road in obedience to your telegram of today. I have now only the provost guard and the men on duty with General Easton. I feel safe if I can have cavalry to scout the country, but if this leaves me, there is some danger of dash being made into the city, which would result in the loss of our stores. Shall I bring back the troops, or can the cavalry remain?
H. W. SLOCUM, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.
Major-General SLOCUM, Atlanta, Ga.:
The cavalry will remain at Atlanta, and General Kilpatrick has been ordered to reorganize it without bringing it away.
W.T. SHERMAN, Major-General

I have now in the commissary depots at Atlanta everything we will require for the trip.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.
Major-General HOWARD, Smyrna Camp, Ga.:
Your dispatch reporting position received. You can send your wagons into Atlanta, and have them loaded and parked. General Easton reports plenty of grain there and Colonel Beckwith has stores plenty also. Collect all your men to get paid and do everything necessary to make a clear start about the 10th. Garrison Marietta as circumstances call for, and break up the present garrison, sending regiments composing it to their respective corps.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

ROME, November 5, 1864-6. 15 p. m.
Major-General SHERMAN:
The following is the information obtained from prisoners captured near Cedartown and Cava Spring by a reconnoitering party sent out by your direction to-day. All or part of Jackson’s and Wheeler’s cavalry in and about Jacksonville, with brigades pushed out on various roads to watch your movements. In the event you go south, one corps is to keep in your advance, laying waste the country; another corps to follow in your rear. In the event go north or follow Hood the whole force is to hang on your flanks and rear. These are said to be instructions from Beauregard. There are no forces of any size within twenty miles of here in any direction.
JNO M. CORSE, Brigadier-General

Thomas Writes From Nashville:

Reports from Johnsonville, by telegraph, from Colonel Thompson, state that the enemy commenced crossing the Tennessee, about five miles above Johnsonville, this morning, with the cutter and gig of the gun-boat Undine, which they had hauled above the town on wagons, and two flat-boats, constructed by themselves. No shots were exchanged since early this morning, and the enemy were engaged in burying their dead on the opposite bank of the river. The gun-boats were in sight below the town, and several shots had been fired by them at the enemy’s batteries, on the bank of the river, which prevented the boats from getting up to the town. Colonel Gallup, of General Schofield’s corps, had arrived at Johnsonville about 3 p. m. today with 1,000 men, and General Schofield, with whole portion of his troops, went down this afternoon, and the whole corps will be there as soon as possible.

Colonel Gallup is hard at work, and says in a short time he will be able to make a successful fight against any attack the enemy may make on him. With General Schofield and his command there, in addition to the force already in the place. I have no fear of the enemy getting possession of the town. General Croxton, from Shoal Creek bridge, at 8 o’clock this a.m., reports that one of his scouts, just in from over the river, states that the greater portion of Hood’s army is still south of the river, out of rations, and butchering everything in the country. Hardee’s corps and the cavalry not arrived yet, and that General Sherman was expected.

Their lines on this side of the river are the same as last reported, with no increase of force. General Croxton attacked their outpost yesterday on the Huntsville, military, and an intermediate road, and, after driving them a short distance, came upon a strong and well connected line of infantry, beyond which their campfires could be seen. They are very strict, allowing no one to pass through their lines, and it is a difficult matter to get reliable information. A prisoner, captured on the 31st ultimo, was from Cleburne’s Division. No report from General Granger today.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.
Major-General THOMAS, Nashville, Tenn.:
Let me know as soon as possible the truth about the rumor that Beauregard has left Florence and gone to the neighborhood of Corinth.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.
Major-General THOMAS, Nashville, Tenn.:
Telegraph me in general terms, not in cipher, the condition of affairs. We are unable to make out your last cipher dispatch.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

KINGSTON, GA., November 5, 1864. 7 p.m.
Major-General THOMAS:
I have just made out your cipher dispatch of yesterday. Bad for the gun-boats. I would not advise you to send too large a force to Johnsonville, as there cannot be anything but Forrest’s cavalry there. Send some heavier guns and some re-enforcement, but keep your main force in hand till Beauregard develops his plans. I am delayed here by the accumulation of trash which our armies carried with them to Atlanta and which our railroad is slow in getting back, otherwise I am all ready. Will let the men get paid off and election day pass when I will start, say about the 10th. I think Forrest will blockade the Tennessee River until the water rises, when the gun-boats will clean him out, or the same will result as soon as you are in force to cross the Tennessee River above Clifton.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.
Colonel J. N. McARTHUR, Commanding Post, Columbus, Ky.:
Dispatch received. Eight hundred men are plenty. When I refer to Columbus I refer to the forts and guns, not the town. I don’t care a cent about the town. If the enemy approaches Columbus the guns of large caliber must be defended to the death and the town should be burned by you rather than that Forrest should get a pound of provisions of forage. Any attack on Columbus will be a mere dash, and Forrest will not attack men, no matter what their number, who show a determination to fight.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

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