Saturday, July 2, 1864

Near Kenesaw Mountain

McPheron sent a division under ML Smith to the far right this morning at 4 am. Schofield is holding the roads to our right. Smith’s division will enable us to extend our line to the west if attacked. McPherson is preparing to leave his position holding the railroad on our left and get between the enemy and the river threatening his railroad to the rear this should force him off Kenesaw Mountain where he can observe our every move.

I wrote to General SCHOFIELD:
General McPherson is now moving out. General Garrard will cover the depot; but one of the greatest probabilities is that Wheeler’s cavalry will, the moment the disposition of the infantry is discovered, sweep round the flank of the cavalry and try to capture our depot, which should be cleared out tonight or very early in the morning. All were so instructed this morning.

As your command will not probably move from the present position, you had better, unload all wagons and send and bring something in the nature of provisions from the depot to-night. I understand there is an excess of sugar, coffee, and salt. These, with beef, are batter than nothing. It may be you can also procure the full measure of bread. At all events, haul to Wade’s all you can today and tonight, emptying your wagons, where they now are, on the ground.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

SHERMAN’S HEADQUARTERS,

Major-General THOMAS:
By the papers you sent me, I see Forrest is at Tupelo; that the enemy has detected the fact that a heavy force, under A. J. Smith, is moving out of Memphis, as they suppose, to re-enforce us. This will hold Forrest there. Now will be a good time for the raid from Decatur on Opelika. It should consist of not over 2,500 cavalry. No wagons or artillery, or at most a section, and should move first on Pillow, at Oxford or Talladega, and then pass him rapidly, cross the Tallapoosa, and break up the road. If you agree with me I will order it now.
W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General


HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, 
July 2, 1864

Major-General SHERMAN:
I think now would be a good time for the expedition to Opelika if you have any good officers to place in command. I have heard that Roddey also had moved west of Tuscumbia, evidently attracted in that direction by the movements of Smith.

GEO. H. THOMAS. Major-General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, near Kenesaw, July 2, 1864

General ROUSSEAU, Nashville, Tennessee:

Now is the time for the raid to Opelika. Telegraph me whether you go yourself or who will command. Forrest is in Mississippi, and Roddey has also gone there. All other rebel cavalry is here.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

SHERMAN’S HEADQUARTERS,
July 2, 1864: 9.20 p.m.

General THOMAS:
General Harrow, one of McPherson’s division commanders, reports that as he was about to withdraw from his position according to orders, the enemy advanced in column from the mountain and are forming in line of battle at his picket-line at 8 p.m. but I hear no firing. Have telegraphed McPherson that you have reason to believe that the enemy are retiring, and that I regard their coming out this time of night with ostentation to be evidence of their retiring, and have ordered Harrow not to withdraw now, but to feel the enemy and ascertain what he is about. You had better instruct the enemy to be felt at two or three convenient points of your line between this and midnight. We must not attempt any night movements with large forces-because confusion would result, but must be prepared at break of day to act according to the very best information we can gather during the night. I have already re-enforced.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

General SCHOFIELD,
General McPherson is now moving out. General Garrard will cover the depot; but one of the greatest probabilities is that Wheeler’s cavalry will, the moment the disposition of the infantry is discovered, sweep round the flank of the cavalry and try to capture our depot, which should be cleared out tonight or very early in the morning. All were so instructed this morning.

As your command will not probably move from the present position, you had better, unload all wagons and send and bring something in the nature of provisions from the depot to-night. I understand there is an excess of sugar, coffee, and salt. These, with beef, are batter than nothing. It may be you can also procure the full measure of bread. At all events, haul to Wade’s all you can today and tonight, emptying your wagons, where they now are, on the ground.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s