Friday, April 29, 1864

Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, Chattanooga, Tennessee
April 29, 1864; 11 a.m.

General Grant, Culpeper:

I am here. Thomas is already in position; Schofield will be by May 2, and McPherson is marching for LaFayette via this place. All my effective cavalry is heading for Dalton, and I will be all ready by May 5. I will write you fully tonight.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi
In the Field, Chattanooga, April 29, 1864

General McPherson, Huntsville, Alabama

Put everybody in motion at once for Chattanooga by roads north of the Tennessee, according to the figures we agreed on, viz, 10,000 of the Fifteenth Corps and 10,000 of the Sixteenth Corps and Garrard’s cavalry. I have a dispatch from General Grant wanting me to be all ready by May 5. You know how I like to be on time. A steam-boat has gone to Larkin’s for the bridges. Make your orders for the two divisions at Cairo and Clifton as full as possible, and when all things are working well come up.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major General, Commanding.

HUNTSVILLE, April 29, 1864
Major General W. T. Sherman:

The enemy still hang around Decatur in considerable force. As the object in leaving a force there is to protect our right flank and railroad communication, would it not be bettor to withdraw the force we proposed leaving at Decatur to this side of the river and station it on the high ground near the junction, take up the pontoon bridge, and bring the boats up Limestone Creek to near the railroad where they can be guarded and sent to the desired points? The force stationed at the points I suggest will be more securely located and in a position where it can better operate to repel attacks on railroad.

Jason B. McPherson, Major General

Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi
In the Field, Chattanooga, April 29, 1864

General McPherson, Huntsville, Alabama:

I approve your suggestion as to the evacuation of Decatur, but it should only be as an alternative at the last moment. If it be possible to get any of the Clifton force, I would prefer to hold Decatur, as it is a constant threat to North Alabama. It is desirable to keep the rebel cavalry then as long as possible, and I would risk something. It is there merely to watch you.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General

Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi
In the Field, Chattanooga, April 29, 1864

General Hurlbut, Cairo, IIIinois:

The intention is that one of Mcpherson’s divisions remain at Vieksburg and one of yours (Mower’s) at Memphis. Allen is ordered to keep at Memphis enough wagons to move 6,000 men (infantry) at any time. If too many wagons and mules have been brought from Memphis they should be sent back. All of Grierson’s cavalry should go to Memphis, and not wait at Saint Louis for horses. Horses can be sent them, and in the mean time they can do garrison duty. McPherson has at Cairo enough new muskets for his two divisions, and I understand you have some at Memphis. Troops destined for Memphis can be armed there, but if you need more at Cairo, by telegraphing to the Chief of Ordnance at Washington he will order them sent from Saint Louis. You had better have your corps staff with you. Give all orders necessary to expedite the movement of troops to their proper divisions. I will be near here for five days.
W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General, Commanding

Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi, In the Field, Chattanooga, April 29, 1864; 6.30 p.m.

General Grant, Culpeper:

I have news from Atlanta 24th and Dalton 27th. Some of Polk’s troops have arrived. By the 5th all of Thomas’ and Schofield’s troops will be within one march of Dalton, and I doubt not McPherson will be on time. All things working as smoothly as I could expect.

Rosecrans holds some of the Memphis dismounted cavalry to guard against some secret plot in Saint Louis. I think the city police and militia could attend to all such machinations and leave us all our troops at this critical time.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major- General.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s