Monthly Archives: December 2010

December 31, 1860

I observe more signs of a loosened discipline here.  One night, because the supper did not please them, they smashed the crockery and made a riot generally.  We have dismissed five cadets and others must share their fate.  This is … Continue reading

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December 30, 1860

Secretary of War, John Floyd has resigned.  Floyd opposed moving the troops from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter and sides with South Carolina.  Floyd is aiding South Carolina in its destruction of our Constitution.  His war department has failed to … Continue reading

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December 29, 1860

A rumor said that Major Anderson, my old captain has spiked the guns of Fort Moultrie, destroyed it, and taken refuge in Sumter.  This is right.  Sumter is in mid-channel, whereas Moultrie is old, weak and easily approached under cover. … Continue reading

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December 28, 1860

South Carolina has stirred up a great deal of turmoil over the slavery issue.  The election of Lincoln ends all possibility of expanding slavery into the territories.  However, the Republicans are not unanimous for abolition of slavery, nor do I … Continue reading

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December 27, 1860

The election of Mr. Lincoln fell upon us all like a clap of thunder. People see and feel that the South has threatened so long that, if she quietly submits, the question of slavery in the Territories is at an … Continue reading

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December 26, 1860

Christmas is over. Events here seem hastening to a conclusion. I am in an out-of-the-way place, but the special session of the Legislature was so unanimous in arming the State and calling a convention that little doubt remains that Louisiana will, … Continue reading

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December 25, 1860

South Carolina seceded December 20, 1860. Emissaries came to Louisiana to influence the Governor, Legislature, and people, and it is their common assertion that, if all the Cotton States follow the lead of South Carolina, it would diminish the chances … Continue reading

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